Author Topic: Diesel engine catch can long term test  (Read 1246 times)

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Diesel engine catch can long term test
« August 06, 2020, 21:06:34 »
Hello all, I have just installed a catch can on my 2014 diesel i30 hatch.
Any interest on the excellent forum about catch cans and there purpose and usefulness?

I can provide more detail and long term results if people are keen.

Jonesyvt in Perth WA, Australia


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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #1 : August 08, 2020, 00:31:59 »
Hi  Jonesy,
 
If you search "catch can" on the forum there are 12 results (including this one) The site has been a little quiet this week so I for one would appreciate it if you could post even a short summary please.

Could you explain the reasons/benefit of doing it.

Your actions in setting it up...

and the benefits/results.. If you don't mind.

Doesn't have to be too fancy, although a couple of photos would be nice.  :happydance:
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #2 : August 09, 2020, 00:55:02 »


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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #3 : August 09, 2020, 00:56:00 »


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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #4 : August 09, 2020, 01:15:53 »
A couple of photos showing the catch can in situ at the rear of the engine above the turbo unit.

A bit of history about catch cans for me. Until recently I believed catch cans were pushed by the sellers of the product but of little proven value, a friend had to trade in a crdi ute a few months ago as it had worn out the engine in the words of the mechanic” due to excess carbon entering the engine via the intake” and causing excessive wear of the pistons, rings etc.
I have owned or closely serviced 5 crdi vehicles over the last ten years and am curious about this issue of excess buildup of oil and carbon ( soot from exhaust via EGR) in the intake manifold and then into the engine.
I obtained an Isuzu 4jj1 engine a few years ago to rebuild, the intake was very caked up with an oil and carbon paste which surprised me. I own now and had a previous ute with this motor in it.

Look at videos on you tube about carbon build up in Diesel engine intake manifolds if you want more vision of the issue.

Two issues seem to cause problems, soot in the manifold from the egr valve and oil from the pcv system.
These two items mix together to create a mixture that coats the intake and over time causes issues of lack of performance and premature wear in the engine.

A catch can reduces the oil build up in the intake so that is one issue solved or at least reduced.

Various ways are used to reduce the carbon in the intake, not sure what is the best way to do that part yet.

I also used on a Colorado ute I had for 5 years a water vapour system to inject tiny amounts of water into the air intake near the Turbo unit at highways speeds and over some months the engine was cleaned out of the carbon build up. Evidence of this was the fact that new oil stayed clean for many km after a change where before the oil became black very quickly.
Oil and carbon was not bleeding into the cylinders after the clean out.

I will get a photo of the intake manifold from the Isuzu engine and post it.
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #5 : August 09, 2020, 01:19:56 »
The pictures show a generic catch can on my GD i30 diesel. Engine cover won’t fit on but doesn’t matter for now.
I got a catch can off ebay for $55 and used 5/8 inch air hose and a few retic fittings to run the air flow through the catch can set up.

Will check the drain hose after 1000km and see how it goes.
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #6 : August 09, 2020, 01:37:36 »
Here is a photo of the carbo and oil build up in an Isuzu 4jj1 engine as fitted to DMax Utes etc.

Intake manifold ports shown, carbon buildup is a couple of mm thick in places.

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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #7 : August 09, 2020, 01:38:24 »


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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #8 : August 09, 2020, 01:41:12 »
This is not a Hyundai engine and from what I know the i30 diesels are not known for having this issue to the same degree but I have owned two and never even had a rocker cover off one so I can’t be sure what the intake manifold looks like inside.

All crdi motors suffer this a bit I believe.
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #9 : August 09, 2020, 04:26:58 »
Wow excellent post. Thanks very much for doing all that. I think this topic is now worth stickying!
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #10 : August 10, 2020, 01:09:02 »
Catch cans work and are a great investment on Diesels. New GDI engines can also benefit to reduce carbon build up on the back ef the inlet valves.
There are a couple of key points to consider with installing a catch can though.
1- Only buy a reputable brand like the German made Mann Hummel that is a quality unit with a releif valve that works and has a proper filter in it. The filter will need replacing when specified.
2- They require maintenance and must be checked and drained regularly to work and not cause problems. If they are not drained they can block up and pressurise the crank case causing seals to blow.

The cheap Chinese copy cans use a stainless mesh instead of a filter and if you do a search of Berima Diesel they have videos of the cheap copy filters failing apart.

I have fitted and serviced many Man Hummel catch cans over the last 15 years and never had an issue with any of them. I was introduced to them by a customer that was a Diesel mechanic when I was working at a Jeep dealer. He fitted one to his WH Grand Cherokee Diesel and after 100k his inlet was still clean unlike the many others we removed the manifolds on to replace broken butterfly valve linkages. The 3.0 V6 Mercedes engine would clog the inlet up at about 50-75k if they were just used as town runabouts.
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #11 : August 10, 2020, 01:56:11 »
There are good catch cans that also use stainless mesh/wool over perforated core for packing, we had top branded one's on the race cars and if plumbed correctly back to the sump you don't ever have to drain them though they are several hundred dollars.

Performance Warehouse or Chis Mills performance stock some $40 stainless packed jobbies that work well, you just have to drain them when the sight glass fills halfway.

Those cheap Chinese ones from Supercheap and similar auto stores don't have any filter packing in them and are useless.

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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #12 : August 11, 2020, 00:41:24 »
Thanks all for your valuable comments, it helps us get an idea what works and doesn’t work.

The idea of using a quality catch can unit is a theme I have seen in many discussions.
Obtaining a quality unit in a small size seems harder as I needed a small one to fit the engine bay of the i30 GD.

Has anyone had a Hyundai Diesel engine apart and can shed light on how much carbon and oil are deposited into the intake of the engine?

The other issue that relates to this topic is the various ways to reduce the soot that enters the intake system via the EGR valve. I have seen electronic plug in devices and mechanical plates that work to reduce the carbon ingress without tripping the engine fault code.
Any thoughts on ways to reduce carbon and / or remove it once it has built up?


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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #13 : August 11, 2020, 03:01:36 »
I see Ryco have updated their Crankcase filter to a new and better design :link: RCC351 | Air Filters, Oil Filters and Fuel Filters | Ryco Filters | Automotive Filters

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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #14 : August 11, 2020, 05:13:46 »
I remember in tbe 80s it was a case of just blocking the return path. Smarter systems need some specific minimum diameter pinhole in the blanking plate.
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #15 : August 12, 2020, 21:11:37 »
Wow excellent post. Thanks very much for doing all that. I think this topic is now worth stickying!

no  its bloody rubbish. pcv and egr discharges are seperate.i30 has no pcv issues, hes been reading to many 4x4 posters.
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Re: Diesel engine catch can long term test
« Reply #16 : August 12, 2020, 22:35:53 »
Wow excellent post. Thanks very much for doing all that. I think this topic is now worth stickying!

no  its bloody rubbish. pcv and egr discharges are separate.i30 has no pcv issues, hes been reading to many 4x4 posters.

Oh really, that's an interesting point of view.. I have no need to do it in my car, I'll let others decided the merit or otherwise of this practice.
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